Sunday, 17 May 2015

A jolly good thump

Thought you might like to come with me out into the far field......



.........I was standing at the furthest point of our land to take this photo because I was helping Lester out with the fencing. We have finished putting up the fencing wire now, but still need a long line of temporary poles put in before the animals can graze here. The poles can only be temporary because the proper poles we had put in a couple of years fell into the river when heavy water in the river tore away the bank.


This is the temporary fencing line, half of the poles are now in, but over half  are still waiting to be hammered in to the now hard ground. It is a tough job.


..... and standing closer to the edge of the bank, which is now suffering from serious erosion. This is looking down towards the Pyrenees, which is where most of this water is coming from at this time of year.


...... and looking in the other direction, and  you can see where the river is chomping away at our woodland. Mixed feelings, that is what I have when I stand on this spot, mixed feelings because of the sorrow I have for the loss of the land and trees, but still feeling blessed for being brought to this lovely place by the Universe.
****

So it came to the mid morning break of coffee and cake. All outside morning chores were done, and now it was the patch of time between the break and lunch. It can be quite a small patch of time which can easily be wasted especially if tiredness is hanging heavily upon one. On looking at Lester I could see that his eyes were getting a glazed sleepy look, so to perk him up I suggested that I help him with
getting Bonny's pen cleaned out. It was in a muck, and he had got half of it done already, but had sort of run out of steam, and I was needing a break from the house so I thought that the two of us might get the job finished.

Under instruction now.....
" see this wheelbarrow.....you wheel it through there (the middle barn) and out into the middle veg paddock........then you bring it back here and take this one (the other wheelbarrow now full of straw and poo and wetness and aroma) and empty that while I fill this one up for you...."
The wheelbarrow was fully loaded. It was heavy. I could hardly lift the handles to get it moving. Lester had already half filled the other wheelbarrow. I had to get moving.

Things I have learnt:

- that steering a loaded wheelbarrow round tight corners must be done with care, and not to tip it sideways even slightly to help steer it round the corner because the weight of the load will increase the tipping sideways movement and that lady arms really have to struggle to stop the wheelbarrow from dumping its load, so best to wiggle the wheelbarrow to and fro to negotiate any tight corners.

- that when presented with a plank of wood which has been balanced on a couple of bricks down which the wheelbarrow has to be pushed, that it is best to go at speed down this plank, narrow and wobbly that it might be, and not to fear that one might fall off and do a harm to one's self because this will make one take care and slow down which might prove disastrous as the slowing down will make the plank wobble even more which will then encourage one to fall off the plank anyway, plus of course the wheelbarrow which has been placed in one's care for the duration of the trip out to the veg plot. Be mindful then of the responsibility to this fully loaded barrow, and go swiftly down the plank.

- that it is wise to give an extra push to the wheelbarrow as the bottom of the plank is reached to avoid the moment when the wheel of the wheelbarrow connects with the dip where the plank meets the ground.

If being in a 'careful in case I fall off the plank' mindset then one is likely to have a very unhappy experience as the wheelbarrow suddenly comes to a jerking halt similar to that of having the breaks applied to the wheels of a moving car. This will cause a very unhappy experience as the back of the wheelbarrow collides with one's tummy, and one's arms go into overdrive as they try to stop the entire wheelbarrow from falling sideways.

Therefore, as mentioned previously, it is better to go at speed down the plank so that a momentum can be gained to get one's self and the wheelbarrow across the possibly disastrous dip.

- that one might think that one is fitter than one actually is. this being highlighted when the loaded wheelbarrow finally arrives at the site where the load is to be deposited, and there being no energy left in one's lady arms to lift the handles of the wheelbarrow sufficiently high enough so that the load can be tipped out.

that pushing a wheelbarrow over uneven ground can be quite uncomfortable on the feet. That is therefore best to where the stoutest shoes / boots that one owns, and not slipper type shoes / crocs which will only end up making one's feet very sore. 

- that the first time one takes the trip out to the veg plot is a novelty because one is so pleased to have made the trip, but beware that by the second, third, fourth, trip, that the novelty can wear thin.

Best to then put your mind on other things while one continues to work. Best not to get diverted and stop a while to look at the pigs in their paddock nearby. Best not to notice that one of the young female pigs has the hots for the male pig in the pen beside her. Best not to see that she has pushed her rump firmly against the fence in between them so he can get to her. Best not to realise that she has pushed the fence away from the board which is supposed to stop her from doing just that. 
Best not to go do a rescue on that fence. Better even more is not to pick up the wet three pronged gardening implement which is handily placed nearby and prod the frustrated female pig away. 
Ouch! Yes, Ouch! Better to have switched off the electric fencing before one used the implement. 

Not to worry, the thud across one's chest only lasts a moment, but one's head will let one know that one is receiving of an electric shock only after the event has passed, so then one has the curious sensation of thinking 'I'm having an electric shock oh crikey' when one is not actually having an electric shock because the moment of having the electric shock has passed. That one's world might feel that it has stopped, but the good news is that everything will be back to normal shortly.

- that one might have a soppy moment after such an event. That one might just let the wheelbarrow drop and possibly fall on to its side as the magnificent thought dawns upon one that one has just been receiving of one's first real live electric shock. That it is very nice to be 'rescued' by one's partner and told to go inside the house and do something else, like cook dinner. Which I did.

- that it is alright to find one's self yelling at the top of one's voice "I don't want to be a farm girl!" Not to worry, this particular mood will also pass after a cup of tea, a slice of cake, and a change into dry clothes. (It had been raining all the while I had been to and fro with the wheelbarrow)

Bonny's pen is done, now we have the larger pen of Lissie to do, and then on to the sheep barn which is an even bigger space........it might take a while......

Saying bye for now,

Vx


23 comments:

Dawn McHugh said...

I could picture it all and I am still giggling :-)

Vera said...

Dawn, actually it was funny, but only after the event!

Rhodesia said...

Ooops be careful of that fence, electric shocks are not good for the system!! As for heavy wheelbarrows and planks I know the feeling well!

Take care and have a good week Diane

Janice said...

Who knew there were so many things to think about when pushing a too heavy wheelbarrow. Given all those things I think you did very well!!

Vera said...

Diane, oh so you, too, have learnt that wheelbarrows and planks are to be avoided if at all possible!

Janice, I think it would have helped if Lester had not been filling the wheelbarrow to 'man levels'. What I mean is, that if I had been filling the wheelbarrow then it would have been a lot lighter!

Mizumatte said...

yes some things are best to be avoided, but maybe then we don't get so many god giggles.have a blessed week. Jaana

Vera said...

Jaana, I do laugh a lot, especially at things I get up to! Hope you have a nice week. and that it is full of laughter.

the Goodwife said...

There is nothing quite like the unexpected electric shock! I've been "hit" many times, and it never ceases to amaze me how much it can startle and hurt. It's no wonder it works so very well for keeping wayward critters where they belong! Glad your man rescued you and shooed you back to the kitchen! :)

Vera said...

The Goodwife, my man did indeed 'shoo me back to the kitchen'. Although his main motive might have been my physical welfare, it was also getting to be near lunch time which I think was probably one of the reasons I got taken off the wheelbarrowing job

The Broad said...

And to think that all of that didn't dent your sense of humour even one jot! Laughing and shaking my head at the same time, Vera!

rusty duck said...

Ouch!

Vera said...

The Broad, a sense of humour has saved me from many potential sadnesses in my life!

Jessica,'ouch' indeed, but more of a psychological 'ouch' rather than a physical one!

Kerry said...

Great post Vera, laughed out loud a lot. Good luck with the other pens x

Ohiofarmgirl said...

oh no.. i'm so sorry. that is invigorating and not in a good way. i got a shock on time that made my jaw ache for 3 days. i'm pretty sure i had some kind of cardiac event. but great work with the fencing! i know that river is a pain for you but it sure is beautiful.

John Gray said...

Vera
One day
We wull laugh over many glasses of wine xxx

Vera said...

OFG, crikey, your electric shock sounds worse than mine was, and that was bad enough! But we both recovered, ...eventually!

John, now that's something to look forward to!

LaPré DelaForge said...

"Young smallholder...
overloaded barrow....
messing around near electical wires....
big bang...
blue flash...
young smallholder reduced to ash!!"
[to horriblly mangle an old rhyme!]

Hope you are over the thumpers....
and...
you should have been loading barrows for him to push.
Keep well, keep sane, keep taking the dried frog pills!

Jean said...

I never knew that pushing a wheelbarrow could be so......technical!
I'm glad you survived the experience......more practice required perhaps?!!

DUTA said...

I liked the paragraph with the "Best to...". Good humorous writing!

Vera said...

LaPredelaForge, great poem! Thanks for the hint about dried frog pills....not heard of them but will have a look on Amazon!

Jean, ummmmmm, well I can practice I suppose, after all I am a farm gal and therefore should be able to negotiate a laden wheelbarrow even after having been the receiver of an electric shock!

Duta, aw, such a lovely comment, and thankyou.

LaPré DelaForge said...

Re: the dried frog pills....
You'll not find them on Amazon...
you need to knock on the back door of the Unseen University....
and ask for Rincewind!

Vera said...

Oh, silly me! Amazon is my first port of call when I need something, so I thought re: the frog pills...that they might be able to supply me......ah well, this 'Rincewind'....any idea what their postage costs might be?

Tim said...

Methinks you haven't read much, or any, of the late, great Sir Terry Pratchett's Discworld books...
with your sense of humour, you should!!